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Cooking with Susie Q – Week of September 9, 2019

I noticed that the evenings have been a little cooler. I’m sure we will have a few more warm ones, but with school back in session, fall is just around the corner. I hope you will share with us any recipes you have for the coming holidays. We will all be looking for an opportunity to add a new dish or two to our celebrations.

I had a friend ask for a recipe for cinnamon rolls. Paul was looking for a recipe that had lots of cinnamon inside and on the top.  Ok Paul, I told you my favorite and the Bakewell biscuits were the best. Here are the recipes.

 Many of you know that Bakewell is a regional brand and many from outside get it by mail order.  If you can’t find it in your local grocers (here in Houlton that isn’t a problem), google it and it will give you a couple of options for mail order.  If you have family in the area, perhaps if you ask nicely, they may send you some. 

Bakewell Biscuits

4 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon Bakewell Cream

2 teaspoons baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup cold vegetable shortening

1 3/4 cups cold buttermilk 

Directions: Preheat the oven to 475 degrees. In a large bowl, whisk the flour with the Bakewell Cream, baking soda and salt. Using a pastry blender or 2 knives, cut in the vegetable shortening until the mixture resembles small peas. Add the buttermilk and stir with a fork until a dough forms.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead three or four. Roll out the dough 3/4 inch thick. Using a 2-inch-round biscuit cutter or glass, cut out 12 biscuits. Transfer the biscuits to a baking sheet, and bake in the bottom third of the oven for five minutes. Turn off the heat and let the biscuits sit in the hot oven, without opening the door, for about 10 minutes longer, or until golden and cooked through. Transfer the biscuits to a basket and serve immediately. 

For Cinnamon Biscuits, after rolling, and before you cut them spread half a softened stick of butter, sprinkle with 1/2 cup of white sugar mixed with one heaping tablespoon of cinnamon.  Roll up as you would any cinnamon roll from the long end. Slice into 1/ 2 inch slices, put on a baking sheet and bake using directions above.

Cinnamon Rolls

3/4 cup milk 

1/4 cup margarine, softened 

3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

1 (.25 ounce) package instant yeast

1/4 cup white sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup water

1 egg

1 cup brown sugar, packed

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

1/2 cup margarine, softened

1/2 cup raisins (optional)

Directions: Heat the milk in a small saucepan until it bubbles, then remove from heat. Mix in margarine; stir until melted. Let cool until lukewarm. In a large mixing bowl, combine 2 1/4 cup flour, yeast, sugar and salt; mix well. Add water, egg and the milk mixture; beat well. Add the remaining flour, 1/2 cup at a time, stirring well after each addition. When the dough has just pulled together, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth, about 5 minutes. 

Cover the dough with a damp cloth and let rest for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, mix together brown sugar, cinnamon, softened margarine. Roll out dough into a 12×9 inch rectangle. Spread dough with margarine/sugar mixture. 

Sprinkle with raisins if desired. Roll up dough and pinch seam to seal. Cut into 12 equal size rolls and place cut side up in 12 lightly greased muffin cups. Cover and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until browned. Remove from muffin cups to cool. Serve warm 

I really enjoy this time with you each week and would love to hear from you. Do you have any requests? Is there a recipe you have been looking for or remember from your younger years? Can I help you find it? Do you have any recipes that are special to you that you could share with us? Please contact me at susieqcooking@outlook.com or c/o Pioneer Times, P.O. Box 456, Houlton, Maine 04730.

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