Pets

Ark Animal Sanctuary – Week of January 25, 2021

In this article I would like to talk about some of the kitties who are long term residents at The Ark.  Cats who have special needs or health issues are often difficult to ever be placed. It is not because we do not want to place them.

For some it is because many of their needs are very expensive and others just do not welcome the human touch.

 When we started The Ark one of our goals was to provide shelter and care for animals that had absolutely no other alternative in life. I think that we are well on the way to accomplishing that mission.  

The Ark is home to approximately 25 feral cats that were rescued from terrible conditions.  Initially we thought that we would trap, neuter and release them but after spending time with them that was not an option. Feral cats have no food source, they have no shelter and there is no vet care.  We believe that every cat that passes through our doors should have whatever it needs from vet care to food and shelter. 

We do not want to send them back out into a world where they have to fight to stay alive. Our ferals are very happy and content in their accommodations at the Ark. They are in rooms with access to the outdoors where it is fenced in to keep them safe from predators. All in all it is not a bad life. 

We have a cat named Buddy who has digestive problems. Buddy is on a special diet and has to take probiotics everyday as well as B-12 injections periodically. We also have Lil’ Boots who is 13-years-old and deaf. She is also a little overweight.  She loves humans, but not other cats. 

The Ark is currently home to five feline AIDS kitties who are amazing.  Many people will not open their hearts and homes to these guys and they don’t know what they are missing. Feline AIDS is not a death sentence, it simply means they are indoor-only cats. AIDS cannot be transmitted from cat to humans or cats to dogs, only cat to cat through the exchange of fluids. We have had AIDS cats that have lived to be 16-years-old.

 We also have a leukemia cat named Sly who is feral. He has his own room because leukemia is contagious and he can’t be with other cats, unless they also have leukemia.

 In all of these situations we find a way to  help that particular animal. We do not euthanize any animal unless a vet deems it necessary for quality of life. Any animal that passes through our doors gets what it needs no matter what the cost. If money is an issue we find a way.

We are a small organization with no guaranteed income, but we believe that every life is worth saving. We are a rescue that was created from blood sweat and tears. We are a rescue who has come up against many obstacles, but we never gave up. We are a rescue that believes with all of our hearts that we are making a difference in the lives of animals one rescue at a time.

Despite our best efforts there are times when, no matter how hard we try, we cannot save that particular one.  All we can do is hold them and take comfort in the fact that they did not die alone. They left this world with a name and they were safe, warm and loved.

 Our volunteers work tirelessly to care for these animals, but what sets them apart is that they love  what they do. There is no paycheck. it is not a job for them. It is something they want to do, not something they have to do. They  look forward to going to The Ark because it is a de-stressor for them. I guess you could call it therapy.  It is therapy for the cats as well as the humans and it just doesn’t get any better than that.

Thank you for your continued support and as always thank you for reading our column.

The Ark Animal Sanctuary is located on 101 Old Woodstock Road. To contact Lorraine Monfils call 532-7387 or check out their Facebook page. 

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