The Star-Herald

Presque Isle area From our Files – Week of April 13, 2022

75 Years Ago –  April 10, 1947

To benefit Rotary scholarship fund — As a memorial to Paul P. Harris, the founder of Rotary who passed away in January, more than 6,000 Rotary Clubs throughout the world raised a $2 million fund for international student fellowships and for other activities to advance international understanding, goodwill and peace.

Among the first to make a 100 percent contribution toward this special fund was the Rotary Club of Presque Isle, which delivered its check for $1,000 to Rotary headquarters in Chicago. This contribution was made on the basis of $10 minimum from each of the Presque Isle Club’s 80 members.

Aroostook County led the nation in spud production — Aroostook County was the leading Irish potato county in the United States both in production and acreage, according to a report from the 1945 Census of Agriculture issued by Director J.C. Capt, Bureau of the Census. Irish potato production in Aroostook County in 1944 totaled 47,416,804 bushels, harvested from 163,560 acres. This was 13 percent of the total United States production of 356,547,428 bushels, and six percent of the total United States acreage of 2,536,715 acres. Kern County, California, the second ranking potato county, harvested 18,957,668 bushels from 55,774 acres in 1944. 

50 Years Ago – April 12, 1972

4-H parents honored at Easter party — The HalfWay 4-H Club of Westfield had a supper for parents on Saturday, April 1. This was the club’s Easter party. The older teens of the club cooked supper, which consisted of baked beans and hot rolls. The supper was held at the home of their leader, Mrs. Ronald MacDonald. Guests were Richard Verville, Pastor and Mrs. Earl Hodgkins, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cote, Mrs. Guy Hanks, Mrs. Harold Lavway and 12 members of the club. The supper was a success and the club hoped to do something along this line again for the interest of the parents.

Adult Rights for 18ers — “Operation 18” began April 6 in Presque Isle as the processing of ID cards was enacted at the Maine State Liquor Store. “Operation 18” was put into effect to prevent the sale of alcoholic beverages to persons under 18. The new 18-year-old Adult Rights Law was effective June 9. Processing of cards in Presque Isle was also held April 13 and May 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the police station and April 24 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the liquor store.

An undefeated season — Jim Crowley had completed an undefeated season as an unlimited wrestler at Northern Maine Vocational Technical Institute, Presque Isle. A former Sanford High School football and wrestling standout, Crowley was a freshman in the building construction course at the Institute.

Skating winner — Henry Marshall of Presque Isle took first place in Esquire Men Figures at the Mid-Winter Invitational at the New Riverdale Rink in West Warwick, R.I. It was the largest invitational ever held with roller skaters from all over the country competing. Also attending the meet were Kathryn Marshall and her daughters, Sherry, Ellen and Doreen.

25 Years Ago – April 9, 1997

McCain Foods recognized for recycling — An Easton business uses a teamwork concept to produce some winning results. The McCain Foods Inc. Recycling Team was one of five statewide 1997 Private Sector Award recipients honored at the sixth annual Governor’s Waste Reduction Awards in Rockport. The award recognizes outstanding efforts by private and public organizations who demonstrate a commitment to waste reduction through the implementation of programs that contribute to a more sustainable environment. Among the criteria used to select winners included, raising public and employee awareness by increasing participation in waste reduction programs. Demonstrating outstanding efforts to obtain products for high post-consumer recycled content is another key factor.

New pet-sitting business opened — Area pet owners had an alternate choice for care during vacations and business trips with a new business in town. Betsy Campbell, owner, opened “Pet Sitters” in Fort Fairfield. The unique service provided means that pet owners can leave their pets in the comfort  and familiarity of home. The household pets had daily visitations to feed and care for the pets. Each pet got personalized attention during every visit. Not only were the household pet looked after in pampered style, but the mail and newspapers could be brought in and the plants could even be watered. 

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